BIOFRAG at EEF congress in Rome and Writing up

BIOFRAG has presented findings at the EEF congress in Rome as invited talk (symposium organised by Dr Luis Cayuela). The talk can be found here: 2015_Marion_Talk_Rome_v1. We have done an overhaul on the way we analyse edge responses of species and taxonomic groups and on the way we quantify the fragmentation impact. The new metric,…

REDE SESBIOTA joins BIOFRAG

REDE SISBIOTA is a new research network designed to investigate how landscape-scale forest loss affects regional biodiversity patterns of and processes in anthropogenic landscapes of Brazil. Dr Deborah Faria (Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC) and her hard-working colleagues are collaborating with BIOFRAG, contributing their data from multi taxonomic surveys of species and ecological processes such as…

Frogs can see the forest edge

Laure Schneider-Maunoury (contact: lschneid@clipper.ens.fr) has been visiting our research lab (F.E.C., Silwood Park Campus, Imperial College London, UK) since February 2014. Laure is doing a Master’s degree in Ecology, École Normale Supérieure, Paris, France. And she has chosen amphibians and reptiles as and their responses to the edge (created by forest fragmentation) for her graduate project.…

Response of single species to habitat loss and fragmentation is complex

Our BIOFRAG metric is a biodiversity-related indicator that measures the impact of forest fragmentation on biodiversity. Thereby, BIOFRAG represents the similarity of fragmented biological communities to those in continuous forests. But what is the effect of fragmentation on single species? The response of individual species to habitat loss and fragmentation can be quite complex, making…

Forest change in Luquillo, Puerto Rico

The Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research Program has been set up to understand how climate and land use changes are affecting terrestrial and aquatic systems in North-Eastern Puerto Rico, from the peak of the Luquillo Mountains to the city of San Juan. One of the projects carried out at this long-term study site is the…

Flying insects of the night and twilight

How do moths respond to changes in their habitat in human-modified landscapes of the tropics. Dr Joseph Hawes and colleagues conducted one of the first studies (Hawes et al. 2009, Journal of Tropical Ecology) to assess the change in moth diversity in the fragmented landscapes of the Amazon. They found that secondary forests and Eucalyptus…

What can sustainable forestry do for biodiversity ?

This is the central theme of FORESTCHECK – a monitoring project in Jarrah forests (Western Australia) designed by the Government of Western Australia (Department of Environment and Conservation). Dr Richard Robinson is collaborating with the BIOFRAG project providing data on bird biodiversity measured in the beautiful Jarrah forests.